plagiarism

I hate to have to do this. Really, I do. However:

Recently, I have noticed that I am receiving searches based on some of the titles I have reflected on. One in particular caught my attention:

is represented by the nostalgia with which she writes about the various food obsessions she had as a child. as many american writers, nguyen writes about her obsession and her family, creating a space in the literary tradition for her multivalent

This quote comes from the reflection on Bich Minh Nguyen’s Stealing Buddha’s Dinner. What this shows me is that there is someone out there (probably for a class of some sort) who copied a significant portion of the text of that reflection (and, in fact, the thesis of that reflection), and his or her professor is checking up on the work turned in.

Some things to keep in mind:

  1. The work on Poetic Idealism is original and mine.
  2. Many of these have been turned in as assignments for various graduate English courses.
  3. The entries are not necessarily of the standard to be used as sources for academic papers (though I’m honored if you think so).
  4. If you take a chunk of text and do not cite it, that is plagiarism.
  5. YOU WILL GET CAUGHT. It’s a simple Google search, don’t be dumb.

Some resources to help with citation:

  1. Purdue OWL (MLA & APA) (Purdue University’s Online Writing Lab is the Gold Standard for up-to-date reference and style information. As seen below, others are often way out of date.)
  2. Son of Citation Machine (This has Turabian and Chicago; WARNING – MLA and APA are out of date)
  3. Citation Machine (This has a lot of formats, but again the MLA and APA are out of date, so caution with all of them)
  4. Why Cite Sources (From UCLA’s Library)
  5. General Writing Tips (From ODU’s Writing Center (I used to work there!), including MLA/APA citation)

6 thoughts on “plagiarism

  1. Pingback: Reflection on Into These Knots « Poetic Idealism

  2. Pingback: Reflection on Oliver de la Paz’s Requiem for the Orchard « Poetic Idealism

  3. Pingback: Response to Stealing Buddha’s Dinner « Poetic Idealism

  4. Pingback: Poetic Idealism and the Search, pt. 1 « Poetic Idealism

  5. Pingback: A Response to Who Killed Vincent Chin? and The Cheat | Poetic Idealism

  6. Pingback: Response to Maxine Hong Kingston’s The Woman Warrior | Poetic Idealism

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